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FROM the VAULT – 30th Anniversary of the death of Senior Constable Peter Kidd

Peter Grahame John Kidd joined the Queensland Police Service as a Constable on 29 April 1977.  He served at the Traffic Branch from Banyo Police Station, Brisbane Mobile Patrols and as a member of the Brisbane Task Force and Tactical Response Group.

The Induction photo taken of Constable Peter Kidd, 1977.
Image No. PM2168b courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

Tasked with implementing a search warrant on the morning of 29 July 1987, to recapture a Long Bay Jail escapee, members of the Tactical Response Group raided a house at Virginia.  Paul Mullin had scaled the walls of the Sydney correctional centre nine years before, was still on the run and responsible for numerous armed hold-ups.  He was well equipped with firearms and classed as extremely dangerous to the public and police.

Senior Constable Kidd was the first policeman to enter the house where he led an assault team through the living area, into the hallway and towards the main bedroom.  Without warning, Mullin fired shots through the bedroom door, striking the Senior Constable who continued to push through the door and enter rather than take cover, and returned fired at the offender.  The offender continued to shoot at the policemen, severely wounding another Group member, Constable Stephen Grant, before being shot dead.  Senior Constable Kidd then collapsed and later died in hospital.

Funeral procession for Senior Constable Peter Kidd, 31 July 1987.
Image No. PM3030b courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

Hundreds of sworn and unsworn members of the Queensland Police Service paid their respects by joining the funeral procession on 31 July 1987, led by Police Motorcyclists and the Police Pipes and Drums.  By his actions Senior Constable Kidd displayed conspicuous courage.  He was posthumously awarded the Star of Courage, accepted by his parents at a ceremony held on 9 August 1989.  The policeman was also awarded the Queensland Police Valour Medal for putting his duty before his life.

The Star of Courage is awarded for acts of conspicuous courage in circumstances of great peril. It is the second highest Australian Bravery Decoration. Only four Queensland Police officers have been in receipt of the Star of Courage since the award was established in February 1975.
Image courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

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This information has been supplied by the Queensland Police Museum from the best resources available at the time of writing.  The Police Museum is open 9am to 4pm Monday to Thursday and 10am to 3pm on the last Sunday of the month (Feb-Nov) and is located on the Ground Floor of Police Headquarters at 200 Roma Street, Brisbane. Contact: E: [email protected]

“FROM the VAULT – 30th Anniversary of the death of Senior Constable Peter Kidd” by the Queensland Police Service is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (BY) 2.5 Australia Licence. Permissions may be available beyond the scope of this licence. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/au/legalcode

FROM the VAULT – CoP Robert Atkinson

Robert Atkinson commenced cadet training for recruitment in the Queensland Police Force in 1968 with the first station posting at Hemmant, near the port of Brisbane, and relatively close to his childhood home at Wynnum.  Within five years Constable Atkinson had been promoted to the Plain Clothes division of Brisbane’s Criminal Investigation Branch (CIB).  This softly spoken policeman kindly and cleverly continued to unravel many terrible crimes during his next twelve years as the one man CIB outfit at Goondiwindi and then with a team on the Sunshine Coast.

Detective Senior Constable Robert Atkinson, standing tall in the centre row, at the Prosecutors Course, July 1977.
Image PM1683c courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

Degrees in Administrative Leadership and Police Management qualified Detective Sergeant Atkinson to study at the FBI National Academy, Quantico, where he graduated with a Certificate in Criminal Justice.  Promotions to Inspector, Superintendent, Chief Super and Assistant Commissioner followed, and in November 2000 Mr Atkinson became Police Commissioner.

Robert Atkinson, at the rank of Assistant Commissioner in 1998.
Image courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

An advocate for multiculturalism, Commissioner Atkinson encouraged important links with a variety of ethnic and religious communities, and steady progress was made to recruit higher numbers of police and civilian staff, focusing on personnel with Indigenous and multicultural heritage.  The March 2004 induction parade produced the highest number of Indigenous recruits to date (2004).  Commissioner Atkinson also encouraged partnerships with volunteer organisations, promoting this ‘P’ from four new focus principles: Professionalism, People, Performance and Partnerships.

Commissioner Atkinson oversaw the introduction of a national framework to be followed by government leaders after terrorist attacks in the United States of America on September 11, 2001.  Queensland’s turn to host the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) loomed shortly after but proved to be a great success.  Mr Atkinson stated in July 2002 “CHOGM involved the largest security operation undertaken in the 138-year history of the Queensland Police Service.  To bring it to a successful conclusion, while maintaining core policing services throughout Queensland, was an achievement that demonstrated the Service’s capacity to manage security for large-scale events”.

Other achievements by Commissioner Atkinson included the introduction of a state-wide secure digital radio network, establishment of a Counter Terrorism Coordination Unit and five Tactical Crime Squads.  An expansion to the Awards for Excellence categories added Crime Prevention, and increased Police Liaison Officer (PLO) positions included the first Sudanese and Muslim PLO’s.  In 2003 Mr Atkinson recognised the 110th anniversary of the Queensland Police Museum, and praised the performance of Police Pipes and Drums members who had fronted 160,000 people at the Sydney Football Stadium when the Edinburgh Military Tattoo travelled there in 2005.  Policelink, a call centre for use by members of the public to report non-urgent crime, was officially opened by Mr Atkinson in 2010 to compliment the emergency 000 service.  The location in the aptly named Dandiiri (Aboriginal word ‘to meet’) Contact Centre is the meeting and work location of several state government services.

A relaxed and retired Police Commissioner Robert Atkinson wears his Order of Australia medal and enjoys celebrations at the Queensland Police 150th parade, held in Brisbane in 2014.
Image courtesy of Senior Sergeant Mel Wilkins.

After retirement from the Queensland Police Service, the skills in leadership and community engagement consistently displayed by Mr Atkinson during his 44 year police career were recognised; he was awarded with and named as Officer of the Order of Australia.

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This article was written by Museum Assistant Georgia Grier from the best resources available within the Queensland Police Museum.  The Police Museum is open 9am to 4pm Monday to Thursday and 10am to 3pm on the last Sunday of the month (Feb-Nov) and is located on the Ground Floor of Police Headquarters at 200 Roma Street, Brisbane. Contact: E: [email protected]

“FROM the VAULT- CoP Robert Atkinson” by the Queensland Police Service is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (BY) 2.5 Australia Licence. Permissions may be available beyond the scope of this licence. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/au/legalcode

INVITATION – Policing a Colonial Metropolis: from Moreton Bay to Brisbane

Queensland State Archives with the
Harry Gentle Resource Centre are proud to present

Dr Anastasia Dukova
Policing a Colonial Metropolis:
from Moreton Bay to Brisbane

Join us at Queensland State Archives to hear our guest speaker, Griffith University Visiting Fellow Dr Anastasia Dukova, illuminate the key aspects of town life and policing of today’s Brisbane in its transition years, from the arrival of the first immigrant ships in Moreton Bay settlement in the 1840s, to the establishment of Brisbane as a colonial capital in 1859.
Utilising an array of primary records, Dr Dukova will examine the challenges the nascent colonial town policemen faced, also known as foot policemen. What was their day, or night, ‘on the job’ like? Who were these men?

Queensland State Archives
Friday, 14 July 2017
10.30 am to 11.30 am
435 Compton Road, Runcorn, QLD 4113

Book FREE tickets through Eventbrite
to reserve your place.

For more information about this event, please email QSA at [email protected]

FROM the VAULT – The 1889 Sick Leave Audit

A handwritten copy of a wire sent to all Inspectors by Police Commissioner William Parry-Okeden on 21 January 1889 requested to “Say whether you strictly adhere to clause 37, page 203 of [Queensland Police] Manual or whether you give full pay in all cases of sickness”.

The early Manual of Police Instructions and Duties, the copy referred published in 1876 by James C. Beal, Government Printer, William Street, Brisbane, was a series of regulations to guide Queensland’s constabulary.

Clause 37 reads ‘In ordinary cases of sickness, a constable will be considered as on leave of absence, and paid in accordance with clause 4 of “Leave of Absence” ’.  Clause 4 stipulated that “All men incapacitated for duty by accident or illness are to be under the care of the police surgeon, and must be seen by him and reported as being really so incapacitated, within twenty-four hours of their declaring themselves sick.  Without this report no man’s name is to be entered on the sick list”.

In accordance with the wired request, stations commenced submitting their reports.  Several are recorded below:

            From Inspector 2/c Alexander D. Douglas, Normanton, all cases of sickness this district have come under clause 10, page 200. There has been no case under clause 37.  Men suffering from fever constantly perform duty during intervals.

             From Inspector 1/c Frederick J. Murray, Cooktown, re your wire today no pay has ever been deducted from sick constables beyond hospital charges when long enough sick to go there.

             From Inspector 2/c John Stuart, Port Douglas, your telegraph today I do adhere strictly to clause 37, except when sickness is the result of misconduct, the rule in this district appears to be to five [days] full pay in all cases of sickness.

            From Sub-Inspector 1/c Ernest Carr, Winton, re your wire twenty first instant one constable received full pay while suffering from effects of accident to his kneecap received in scuffle with prisoner on New Year’s Day 1887.  All other cases regulations strictly adhered to.


            From Inspector 2/c William Britton, Blackall, re your wire today, Senior Constable Livingstone got three months sick leave without pay and this is the only case of sickness since I took charge.

             From Inspector 1/c Aulaire L. Morisset, Rockhampton, your telegram today I cannot say I have always strictly enforced provision clause 37, page 203.  I frequently experience difficulty in obtaining necessary repots etc. but make it a rule as far as practicable to report all cases coming under this clause to Commissioner.

Inspector 1/c Aulaire L. Morisset.  Image PM1825 part of the Queensland Police Museum collection.

            From Inspector 1/c Samuel J.C. Lloyd, Maryborough, re telegram of yesterday have given full pay in all cases of sick leave.

            From Senior Sergeant John Kincaide, Charleville, re your wire today not aware of men being sick for a long period since Inspector Ahern came to this District only Senior Sergeant Kincaide who was suffering from diarrhoea and inflammation of the lungs.

            From Inspector 1/c William Harris, Toowoomba, re your wire today don’t remember any man sick over fourteen days except one at Goondiwindi from fever contracted through sleeping in prison cell, there being no other quarters and he was allowed full pay. Men meeting with accidents in the discharge of duty are said to be sick whilst absent from duty and would I think be entitled to full pay accident not being the ordinary cases of sickness contemplated by regulations.         

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This information has been supplied by the Queensland Police Museum from the best resources available at the time of writing.  The Police Museum is open 9am to 4pm Monday to Thursday and 10am to 3pm on the last Sunday of the month (Feb-Nov) and is located on the Ground Floor of Police Headquarters at 200 Roma Street, Brisbane. Contact: E: [email protected]

“FROM the VAULT- The 1889 Sick Leave Audit” by the Queensland Police Service is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (BY) 2.5 Australia Licence. Permissions may be available beyond the scope of this licence. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/au/legalcode

SUNDAY LECTURE SERIES: The Petrov Affair – a Queensland link


The Petrov Affair – a Queensland link

 25 June 2017
11:00am – 12:30pm

 Police Headquarters
200 Roma Street
Brisbane  QLD  4000

FREE ENTRY

The Petrov Affair was a Cold War spy incident in Australia in April 1954, concerning Vladimir Petrov, Third Secretary of the Soviet embassy in Canberra and his wife Evdokia. It would be the one of the most important defections in the west during the Cold War.

Greg Cope, Assistant Director of the Queensland Office of National Archives of Australia is the guest speaker for the Police Museum Sunday Lecture on June 25.

Greg will outline the Petrov Affair from the beginning of their arrival in Australia in February 1951 to what happened to them after the defection.  Now, after all this time the whole story can be revealed with the release of documents in Australia, United Kingdom and the United States.

The Petrov affair is entangled in politics, elections, referendums and a Royal Commission.  The photographs of the Russian body guards dragging Evdokia onto a plane at Mascot airport would become the most famous media images in Australia in the 20th Century.

During his presentation, Greg will outline what the Petrovs did in Queensland which would almost reveal their identity and location to the KGB.  They were wanted by the KGB for over 20 years.  It would be the Queensland Police who would identify Vladimir and would have to manage the situation. Greg will also discuss their life in Australia after defection, up to the time of their deaths.

The one-and-a-half hour presentation will begin at 11am on Sunday, June 25 and will provide educational and up-to-date content suitable for all audiences.

The Museum opens its doors to the public on the last Sunday of each month from 10am to 3pm from February to November in addition to the standard Monday to Thursday 9am to 4pm opening hours. Monthly Sunday openings feature guest speakers from across the historical and crime-solving spectrums.

PLEASE NOTE: The Police Museum will open on Sunday June 25
from 10am to 3pm, and is located on the ground floor of
Police Headquarters, 200 Roma Street, Brisbane.

FROM the VAULT – Alderley Garage Turns 30!

On 24 June 1987 the Queensland Police Department moved their vehicle depot from the heritage listed Petrie Terrace Police Barracks to an existing building in Pickering Street, Alderley.  The low rise concrete and glass complex was purchased from Gordon and Gotch for $5.83 million, with the intention of housing the Transport Section, Allied Trades, Uniform Store, Radio and Electronics and eventually P.S.R.T. (Public Safety Response Team).  Alterations were necessary and completed at a cost of $2 million.  This included new office furniture and garage equipment to future proof the already modern building, sprawled over nearly 6 acres.

A Mechanic working on a police car at the Alderley Police Depot, c1988.
Image No. PM2850 courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

In its first year of operation Transport Section mechanics serviced 673 vehicles.  Training was given to Departmental tradies to keep them updated with vehicle technology, and training was also given to apprentice mechanics.  A squad including four qualified motor mechanics, created specifically to investigate traffic accidents, was moved to the new Alderley garage and utilised a Ford Transit van fully fitted out for crash scene investigation.

Traffic Accident Investigation Squad van parked at Alderley Police Depot, c1989.
Image No. PM3297 courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

For a short time the Brisbane Dog Squad called the Alderley premises their headquarters.  A portable building on the site was surrounded by tall chain wire fencing to keep the furry squad safe from the busy Transport Section between 1992 and 1999.  But the location was never suited to the needs of the Dog Squad, and they moved to their present home at the Oxley Police Academy in May 1999.

Store room at the Alderley Police Depot, c1988.
Image No. PM2851a courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

In 2001 the Police Bulletin (Issue No. 222, 1 Nov 2001, p. 12) looked back at the transition of the Transport Section when housed at Police Terrace, and their move to the Alderley location; ‘By 1987 the garages at the Petrie Terrace Depot had become too small and cramped to efficiently conduct mechanical and service work as the Queensland Police Department had acquired more vehicles and equipment.  However, staff made do with the accommodation available.  In February 1982, it was reported ‘staff at Transport Section are currently saving the Department thousands of dollars’ and noted that in addition to regular vehicle maintenance, staff were building horse floats and constructing light bars and security screens.  Inspector-in-Charge Jack Kane outlined plans for the future: “We would like to set up our own panel beating and paint shop at the Depot…however we do not have sufficient space”.’  There is certainly more space at Alderley and we wish the Garage a happy 30th birthday for June 24, 2017!

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This article was written by Museum Assistant Georgia Grier from the best resources available within the Queensland Police Museum.  The Police Museum is open 9am to 4pm Monday to Thursday and 10am to 3pm on the last Sunday of the month (Feb-Nov) and is located on the Ground Floor of Police Headquarters at 200 Roma Street, Brisbane. Contact: E: [email protected]

“FROM the VAULT – Alderley Garage Turns 30!” by the Queensland Police Service is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (BY) 2.5 Australia Licence. Permissions may be available beyond the scope of this licence. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/au/legalcode

  

FROM the VAULT – CoP James Patrick O’Sullivan

Prior to the retirement of Police Commissioner James Patrick O’Sullivan, Jenny Fleming from the Queensland Police Union Journal spoke with Mr O’Sullivan about his 41 year policing career, including 8 as Commissioner.  The following is a condensed version of that interview;

Jenny: In 1993 you had been Commissioner for a year. At that time you said to me: “My whole trust and philosophy revolves around our primary objective of preservation of life and property.  It underpins the whole strategy.  If we fail there we fail everywhere”.  How do you think the Service has aspired to this strategy?

Commissioner: The Service has come a long way on many fronts.  Particularly in terms of preservation of life and property.  The recent statistical review and report that came out of the Federal Bureau of Statistics, in eight of the thirteen categories of crime, Queensland was the lowest in the nation.  While property crime is still at an unacceptable level, we are on the right track.  Our strategies are working but there’s a lot more work to be done and while you have a drug problem you are going to have a lot of property crime.  If you could solve the drug problem you could reduce the property crime overnight, probably by 60, 70 percent.

Commissioner James P. O’Sullivan.
Image No. PM1486 courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

Jenny: What have been the highlights of your term as Commissioner?

Commissioner: There have been a lot of highlights really.  I think one of the main highlights is that we have come from a fairly ordinary sort of situation where respect for the Service was at an all-time low [during the Fitzgerald Inquiry] to a highly professional police service.  We have been able to regain the confidence of the community.  We are recognised now as the leader in areas of law enforcement in Australasia.  We are sending people overseas to lecture other law enforcement agencies on some of our computerised equipment.  We have seen the whole of the Service computerised, particularly in respect to crime, how it is reported, how intelligence is gathered.  We have reformed the Bureau of Criminal Intelligence totally.  We have overturned and reconstructed the educational training system in the human resources area and we are now recruiting top quality people who have work experience and life experiences.  We are targeting them at age 25, 26 and the majority have first degrees, some have second and third degrees.  We are getting the people who have all the skills and are highly motivated and top quality people.  So in terms of highlights, we have done a lot, and accountability… we have certainly made the Service open and accountable.

Jenny: What about the lows?

Commissioner: The only lows that I see are when we lose our people to tragedies, good decent people are killed in the line of duty.  That has been with us more than ever.  Quite recently too.       

Jenny: Do you think the North Queensland [Police] Academy has eased things a bit?

Commissioner: It has been very successful, quite frankly.  There was quite a lot of negativity coming from areas of the department and indeed government about that, but it is performing very well indeed.  So much so that we are in the middle of endeavouring to obtain funding to enlarge it and rebuild the campus.  It is a success story because most of the people graduating from the Townsville Academy stay in the north of the state.  For years we had a problem of finding people to go into those outlying areas.  Nowadays, I would say 95 percent of the graduates stay up there or go further west so that’s good.  We are recruiting people mainly from the north who don’t see Brisbane as their ultimate destination place.  As well we no longer have the difficult transfer issues we used to have.

Jenny: You come from an operations background.  What do you see as the major operational changes in the last 41 years?

Commissioner: When I was a young detective, we didn’t have typists.  Most of us couldn’t type, only with two fingers.  You had to type all your own briefs, all your own statements, prepare your own case, buy your own typewriter, and there you were.  There weren’t that many police around in those days.  We were very busy.  Now the technological age is with us and we have work stations and computers, and any amount of administrative assistants available as well as the computerisation of the Service.  In my day, when I was a young detective you might wait a fortnight to obtain a criminal history unless it was urgent, and you sent someone to the Sydney Central Fingerprint Bureau.  Now they have got instant access to intelligence and criminal history across the board.

Commissioner Jim O’Sullivan commissions the aircraft “Captain Stan Pullen” in 1996, named after the Police Airwing pilot, and was purchased by the Queensland Police Service for just over $3 million dollars.
Image No. PM2769 courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

Jenny: Have you enjoyed your career?

Commissioner: Oh, I have.  It’s been a wonderful career for me.  The Service has progressed very well.  I have been the leader but I say continually it is great people who are around me and throughout the department that have done a lot more than I have. They don’t get the recognition half the time.

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The interview with James ‘Jim’ O’Sullivan was conducted by Jenny Fleming, and published on pages 14 – 17 of the Queensland Police Union Journal in September 2000.  The interview in its entirety is available from the Queensland Police Museum.  We are open from 9am to 4pm Monday to Thursday and 10am to 3pm on the last Sunday of the month (Feb-Nov) and located on the Ground Floor of Police Headquarters at 200 Roma Street, Brisbane. Contact: E: [email protected]

“FROM the VAULT- CoP James Patrick O’Sullivan” by the Queensland Police Service is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (BY) 2.5 Australia Licence. Permissions may be available beyond the scope of this licence. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/au/legalcode

FROM the VAULT – Refrain, reuse, recycle

Thrifty fore folk left fascinating evidence of overseas trading preferences, restricted finances and careful reuse in hundreds of memorandums retained by the Queensland Police Museum.  In October 1929 Commissioner William Harold Ryan signed Circular Memorandum with the following direction;

Officers–in-charge of Districts are advised that intimation has been received from the Chief Secretary’s Office, to the effect that it has now been decided that the Queensland Government, in placing orders for material and in accepting tenders, will give;

           1) 5 per cent preference to goods of Queensland manufacture over goods manufactured in other Australian States,

             2) 5 per cent preference to goods manufactures in the other Australian States over British goods,

             3) 5 per cent preference to British goods over foreign goods including goods manufactured in the United States of America.

Constable Robert G. Pacholke on horseback near the Fossilbrook Police Station agistment yard, c1928.
Image No. PM1110 courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

Due to good growing conditions the purchase of forage for horses was expected to reduce, with agistment obtained instead, but this was not the only cost mentioned when scrutinising expenditure in September 1930;

Transfers in future cannot be taken into consideration except in cases of absolute hardship or necessity, and then it must be stated as already instructed, whether the applicant is able and willing to pay the expenses of transfer.

Railway Fares, Freights and Conveyance – the interest of the Department and the present economic stress must ever be borne in mind when services have to be performed under this heading.  The horses provided by the State must be used in all practicable instances, and the tendency to use private cars or motor cycles at the cost of the State must be discontinued.  Claims for mileage will, in future, be closely watched and will not be passed unless the circumstances indicate special urgency and the need to avoid dangerous delay. 

Until further ordered Police Reports may be written on both sides of the paper, the margin on the reverse side being retained on the right hand edge of the paper.  Moreover when applications for leave etc. are submitted, there is not real need to attach a separate report, and any relevant information that cannot be shown on the race of the application can be set out in a report or memorandum on the back thereof.

Control of Fibres and Jute Goods Order from the Prime Minister, Canberra, 1943.

In March 1943 the Department of Supply and Shipping reported an acute shortage of fibre supplies, so much so that an order from the Prime Minster was forwarded to all government departments requesting the conservation of such products, which was in turn provided in a Commissioner’s Memorandum;

“Control of Fibres and Jute Goods Order – Conservation of Rope, Cordage, Twine and String”
Old rope, binder twine and similar types of cordage should be saved for teasing and manufacture again into other commodities.  Details of the arrangements that have been made for the purchase and processing of this material are set out in circular letter
[dated] 22nd March 1943 from the Controller of Fibres.  Commonwealth Departments are being advised that specifications should be revised with the object of saving as much fibre as possible, and that everybody must be prepared to accept and use the type, size and quality of rope, cordage or twine that will do the particular job in hand, regardless of colour, appearance and special preferences.

DISCLAIMER – No animals were harmed whilst writing this article, and all horses were appropriately fed and watered.

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This information has been supplied by the Queensland Police Museum from the best resources available at the time of writing.  The Police Museum is open 9am to 4pm Monday to Thursday and 10am to 3pm on the last Sunday of the month (Feb-Nov) and is located on the Ground Floor of Police Headquarters at 200 Roma Street, Brisbane. Contact: E: [email protected]

“FROM the VAULT- Refrain, reuse, recycle” by the Queensland Police Service is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (BY) 2.5 Australia Licence. Permissions may be available beyond the scope of this licence. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/au/legalcode

SUNDAY LECTURE SERIES: The Fingerprint Expert

The Fingerprint Expert

28 May 2017
11am – 12.30pm

 Police Headquarters
200 Roma Street
Brisbane  QLD  4000

FREE ENTRY

Matching fingerprints from a crime scene to an offender or using fingerprints to identify disaster victims is a small part of Sergeant Tony Martinez’s role at the Queensland Fingerprint Bureau. Sergeant Martinez is stationed at the Queensland Police Service Fingerprint Bureau and is the guest speaker for the Police Museum Sunday Lecture on May 28.

Sergeant Martinez has attended serious crime scenes, conducted countless laboratory examinations for fingerprint evidence, and has been actively involved in identifying offenders by analysing and identifying collected fingerprint evidence. Sergeant Tony Martinez is a qualified Fingerprint Expert, a qualification that is awarded by the Australian Forensic Field Sciences Accreditation Board and is recognised worldwide.

During his presentation, Sergeant Martinez will outline that fingerprint identification has been around for more than 100 years and is a cornerstone to the forensic discipline. The use of fingerprint identification helps identify offenders and place them at crime scenes, identifies disaster victims, and is a valuable biometric tool in busy airports all over the World.

Sergeant Martinez will also discuss the recent advances in fingerprint identification technology and image transmission, which provides Queensland police officers with valuable information to help solve crimes.  These advances, along with comparisons to past techniques will be discussed and examples will be given.

The one-and-a-half hour presentation will begin at 11am on Sunday, May 28 and will provide educational and up-to-date content suitable for all audiences.

The Museum opens its doors to the public on the last Sunday of each month from 10am to 3pm from February to November in addition to the standard Monday to Thursday 9am to 4pm opening hours. Monthly Sunday openings feature guest speakers from across the historical and crime-solving spectrums.

PLEASE NOTE: The Police Museum will open Sunday May 28 from 10am to 3pm, and is located on the ground floor of Police Headquarters, 200 Roma Street, Brisbane.

FROM the VAULT – CoP Noel Newnham

Noel Ronald Newnham came to Queensland from the Victorian Police Service and took the Oath to become our 16th Police Commissioner at a ceremony on November 1, 1989.  He was ‘selected from dozens of Australian and overseas applicants, [and] will oversee massive reforms of the Queensland Police Force in the wake of the Fitzgerald Report’ (Vedette, October 1989, cover).  Contracted for three years to implement recommendations made by Mr Tony Fitzgerald, QC, Mr Newnham proved to be a no-nonsense choice for the role.  At the commencement of his tenure Commissioner Newnham said, ‘It’s the most rewarding and challenging job that could possibly be imagined by anyone.  It is a time to look forward with enthusiasm and optimism, to a revitalised Police Service’.

Commissioner Noel Newnham was appointed as Queensland’s Police Commissioner for a 3 year term between 1989 and 1992.
Image No. PM1179 courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

Commissioner Newnham set about improving morale within the Service.  Several initiatives encouraged community policing, including Crime Stoppers and Neighbourhood Watch.  The employment of Regional Commanders, decentralised administration and shifting duties to civilian employees when police powers were not required all helped to redirect policing skills where they were needed most.  Merit based selection was refined, and new performance assessment procedures trialled.

A year on, November 26, 1990, a time capsule was placed inside the newly built Police Headquarters building which included a letter written by Commissioner Newnham addressed to his successor.  He wrote of the symbolism of new beginnings in a new building, and partisan efforts to recover public confidence in the Queensland Police Service; ‘We are striving to bring about change, modernisation, rejuvenation and a full commitment to the ideals of integrity, dedication and service’.

Plaque placed by Commissioner Newnham to denote the location of the time capsule within Queensland Police Headquarters. Only 73 more years to wait before it’s opened!
Image No. PM2784 courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

One anecdote from a previous member of the Queensland Police Pipes and Drums describes the enthusiasm for, and leadership style of Mr Newnham towards his staff: Pipe bands from around the country had attended the biannual Australian Pipe Band Championships, held in Brisbane in 1990.  They were competing for several titles; Grades 1 to 4, Champion Drum Major, and best Juvenile Band.  Commissioner Newnham attended the finals to witness the success by the Victoria Police Band who came 1st in Grade 1 division, and his new band, the Queensland Police Pipes and Drums who came 1st in Grade 3 division.  The event was held in October’s warm spring temperatures, and preparations to celebrate their win included arranging a large esky packed with ice and beverages, to be stored under a marquee for Victorian and Queensland police band members to share after the competition.

With all bag pipping and drumming events completed at the end of two exhausting days, the esky was calling, however Mr Newnham conveniently used it as a seat.  Thirsty band members waited patiently and made polite conversation with the Commissioner as afternoon temperatures soared.  Finally, Mr Newnham said his goodbyes and departed, allowing the musicians access to their esky and stock of well-earned cold beers.

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This article was written by Museum Assistant Georgia Grier from the best resources available within the Queensland Police Museum.  The Police Museum is open 9am to 4pm Monday to Thursday and 10am to 3pm on the last Sunday of the month (Feb-Nov) and is located on the Ground Floor of Police Headquarters at 200 Roma Street, Brisbane. Contact: E: [email protected]

“FROM the VAULT- CoP Noel Newnham” by the Queensland Police Service is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (BY) 2.5 Australia Licence. Permissions may be available beyond the scope of this licence. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/au/legalcode

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2017 SUNDAY LECTURE SERIES

July 30
Is Jack the Ripper lying in Toowong Cemetery?
11:00-12:30

August 27
To be determined
11:00-12:30

September 17
Off site, and by special invitation for myPolice Museum subscribers

October 29
Fraud Prevention
11:00-12:30

November 26
Boggo Road Gaol
11:00-12:30