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SUNDAY LECTURE SERIES: The Fingerprint Expert

The Fingerprint Expert

28 May 2017
11am – 12.30pm

 Police Headquarters
200 Roma Street
Brisbane  QLD  4000

FREE ENTRY

Matching fingerprints from a crime scene to an offender or using fingerprints to identify disaster victims is a small part of Sergeant Tony Martinez’s role at the Queensland Fingerprint Bureau. Sergeant Martinez is stationed at the Queensland Police Service Fingerprint Bureau and is the guest speaker for the Police Museum Sunday Lecture on May 28.

Sergeant Martinez has attended serious crime scenes, conducted countless laboratory examinations for fingerprint evidence, and has been actively involved in identifying offenders by analysing and identifying collected fingerprint evidence. Sergeant Tony Martinez is a qualified Fingerprint Expert, a qualification that is awarded by the Australian Forensic Field Sciences Accreditation Board and is recognised worldwide.

During his presentation, Sergeant Martinez will outline that fingerprint identification has been around for more than 100 years and is a cornerstone to the forensic discipline. The use of fingerprint identification helps identify offenders and place them at crime scenes, identifies disaster victims, and is a valuable biometric tool in busy airports all over the World.

Sergeant Martinez will also discuss the recent advances in fingerprint identification technology and image transmission, which provides Queensland police officers with valuable information to help solve crimes.  These advances, along with comparisons to past techniques will be discussed and examples will be given.

The one-and-a-half hour presentation will begin at 11am on Sunday, May 28 and will provide educational and up-to-date content suitable for all audiences.

The Museum opens its doors to the public on the last Sunday of each month from 10am to 3pm from February to November in addition to the standard Monday to Thursday 9am to 4pm opening hours. Monthly Sunday openings feature guest speakers from across the historical and crime-solving spectrums.

PLEASE NOTE: The Police Museum will open Sunday May 28 from 10am to 3pm, and is located on the ground floor of Police Headquarters, 200 Roma Street, Brisbane.

FROM the VAULT – CoP Noel Newnham

Noel Ronald Newnham came to Queensland from the Victorian Police Service and took the Oath to become our 16th Police Commissioner at a ceremony on November 1, 1989.  He was ‘selected from dozens of Australian and overseas applicants, [and] will oversee massive reforms of the Queensland Police Force in the wake of the Fitzgerald Report’ (Vedette, October 1989, cover).  Contracted for three years to implement recommendations made by Mr Tony Fitzgerald, QC, Mr Newnham proved to be a no-nonsense choice for the role.  At the commencement of his tenure Commissioner Newnham said, ‘It’s the most rewarding and challenging job that could possibly be imagined by anyone.  It is a time to look forward with enthusiasm and optimism, to a revitalised Police Service’.

Commissioner Noel Newnham was appointed as Queensland’s Police Commissioner for a 3 year term between 1989 and 1992.
Image No. PM1179 courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

Commissioner Newnham set about improving morale within the Service.  Several initiatives encouraged community policing, including Crime Stoppers and Neighbourhood Watch.  The employment of Regional Commanders, decentralised administration and shifting duties to civilian employees when police powers were not required all helped to redirect policing skills where they were needed most.  Merit based selection was refined, and new performance assessment procedures trialled.

A year on, November 26, 1990, a time capsule was placed inside the newly built Police Headquarters building which included a letter written by Commissioner Newnham addressed to his successor.  He wrote of the symbolism of new beginnings in a new building, and partisan efforts to recover public confidence in the Queensland Police Service; ‘We are striving to bring about change, modernisation, rejuvenation and a full commitment to the ideals of integrity, dedication and service’.

Plaque placed by Commissioner Newnham to denote the location of the time capsule within Queensland Police Headquarters. Only 73 more years to wait before it’s opened!
Image No. PM2784 courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

One anecdote from a previous member of the Queensland Police Pipes and Drums describes the enthusiasm for, and leadership style of Mr Newnham towards his staff: Pipe bands from around the country had attended the biannual Australian Pipe Band Championships, held in Brisbane in 1990.  They were competing for several titles; Grades 1 to 4, Champion Drum Major, and best Juvenile Band.  Commissioner Newnham attended the finals to witness the success by the Victoria Police Band who came 1st in Grade 1 division, and his new band, the Queensland Police Pipes and Drums who came 1st in Grade 3 division.  The event was held in October’s warm spring temperatures, and preparations to celebrate their win included arranging a large esky packed with ice and beverages, to be stored under a marquee for Victorian and Queensland police band members to share after the competition.

With all bag pipping and drumming events completed at the end of two exhausting days, the esky was calling, however Mr Newnham conveniently used it as a seat.  Thirsty band members waited patiently and made polite conversation with the Commissioner as afternoon temperatures soared.  Finally, Mr Newnham said his goodbyes and departed, allowing the musicians access to their esky and stock of well-earned cold beers.

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This article was written by Museum Assistant Georgia Grier from the best resources available within the Queensland Police Museum.  The Police Museum is open 9am to 4pm Monday to Thursday and 10am to 3pm on the last Sunday of the month (Feb-Nov) and is located on the Ground Floor of Police Headquarters at 200 Roma Street, Brisbane. Contact: E: [email protected]

“FROM the VAULT- CoP Noel Newnham” by the Queensland Police Service is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (BY) 2.5 Australia Licence. Permissions may be available beyond the scope of this licence. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/au/legalcode

FROM the VAULT – Policing Brisbane before Queensland

It is tempting to picture early colonial Brisbane as a lawless place inhabited by convicts and ticket-of-leavers, convicts on parole, and the military. In the first five years, Brisbane population increased by more than twenty-fold, from approximately 50 in 1824, the year of settlement, to 1108 in 1829, including 18 female convicts the very first women to arrive into the settlement. (4) The latter flamed much local enthusiasm. The building then known as ‘the gaol’ was erected for their accommodation. ‘The “female factory” proved a grand source of intrigue and vice, and some queer tales [were] handed down to us – the gay Lotharios of which were not by any means the lowest people in the settlement.’ (5, p. 65) Although a wall was constructed around the building, which was quickly found to be positively necessary, did ‘not seem to have been proof against the agility and nimbleness of the midnight rovers who had first all secured the blindness of the warders by a liberal use of bucksheesh.’ (Ibid) Regardless of the counter measures soon intrigue and licentiousness were rife.

Female Convict Factory, c1850.  John Oxley Library image number 153725.

For the next decade, until 1839, Moreton Bay saw a steady stream of convicts. In 1839, the last draft of convicts landed on the banks of the Brisbane River, both male and female. The earliest attempts to codify and regulate public order in Brisbane town date to 1838. The Police Act of 1838 (2 Vic., No. 2) provided for appointment of police magistrates and justices to suppress riots, tumults, and affrays in towns. Reminiscent of the Statute of Winchester or the Fairs and Markets in Churchyards Act, 1285, the first formal attempts to keep criminal element in check in England, Brisbane policemen were entrusted with an array of duties and responsibilities. Any constable was granted powers to arrest any person ‘found drunk in any street or public place, and also all loose, idle, drunken, or disorderly persons who [a constable] shall find between sunset and 8 am lying or loitering in any street, highway, yard, or other place, not giving a satisfactory account of themselves, and convey to lockup.’ (1) Per the Statute of 1285, the men who patrolled the streets after nightfall (commonly known as the night watchmen) were vested with power to arrest any stranger until morning.

Police Act 1838. See the link below for a downloadable PDF file.

Police Guide – Police Act of 1838

Following the nineteenth century reforms in the police forces of England, Ireland and Scotland, the Brisbane force was also responsible for monitoring and curtailing certain behaviours as well as crime. (2) These included enforcing trading hours, the penalty for operating outside of these hours was £3, such as on Sundays after 10 am; keeping billiard or other places of amusement open was liable to a higher fine of £5. The majority of daily activities of the town life were soon regulated. These ranged from damaging a public building to extinguishing a street lamp, and from bathing near or within a view of a public wharf to installation of awnings on shops and houses. Penalties ranged from 1 to 20 pounds. Interestingly enough, the Act did not provide for imprisonment as a form of alternative punishment. This is mainly due to absence of judicial and custodial provisions in place at the time. In 1840, the police force of Brisbane Town consisted of one Chief Constable William Whyte; Bush Constable George Brown (free); four convicts employed as assistant Constables: Francis Black (arrived on Hadlow), Robert Giles (Exmouth), and W H Sketland ‘or Thompson’ (Sophia), and John Egan. (3)

Plan of Brisbane Town Moreton Bay 1839, J G Steele, Brisbane Town in Convict Days, 1824-1842, UQP, 1975, p. 124.

The convict police was relatively short-lived, as now a free settlement of Moreton Bay saw further reforms, legal, governmental, social and policing between the 1840s and 1850s. Captain John Clemens Wickham was appointed a Police Magistrate,  Court of Petty Sessions opened in 1846, a new Police Force was organised in 1850, this was followed by a new Police Act, passed in 1855, and construction of the new jail two years later. Having said that, as the population expanded and policing became more sophisticated, the foundational principles outlined in the 1838 Act remained largely the same demonstrating that though novel female presence in town in 1829 did cause much excitement penal Brisbane was no more lawless than ‘free’ Brisbane.

If you would like to know more about policing colonial Brisbane, please join us in a seminar.  Follow this link to register: http://www.ticketebo.com.au/brisbane-history-group/policing-colonial-brisbane.html

Further reading:

(1) Bain, Donald. Queensland Police Guide; Containing an Epitome of 184 Acts of Parliament to 1891, and a Supplement of 815 Offences, Alphabetically Arranged with Penalties and Punishments. Brisbane: Watson, Ferguson & Co, 1892.

(2) Dukova, Anastasia. A History of the Dublin Metropolitan Police and Its Colonial Legacy. Palgrave Macmillan UK, 2016.

(3) Letters Relating to Moreton Bay and Queensland Received 1822-1869, SLQ, Reel A2 Series.

(4) Population by capital city and rest of state, Queensland, 1823 to 2007. Queensland Government Statisticians Office, http://www.qgso.qld.gov.au/products/tables/historical-tables-demography/index.php

(5) Pugh’s Moreton Bay Almanac, 1859 (first year of publication), Brisbane: Theophilus P Pugh.

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This information has been provided by the Queensland Police Museum from the best resources available.  The article was written by Museum Volunteer and Crime and Policing Historian Dr Anastasia Dukova.

The Police Museum is open 9am to 4pm Monday to Thursday and 10am to 3pm on the last Sunday of the month (Feb-Nov) and is located on the Ground Floor of Police Headquarters at 200 Roma Street, Brisbane. Contact: E: [email protected]

“FROM the VAULT – Policing Brisbane before Queensland” by the Queensland Police Service is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (BY) 2.5 Australia Licence. Permissions may be available beyond the scope of this licence.
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/au/legalcode

Back in the future

Acting Senior Constable Beau McNamara and I recently visited a movie set on the Gold Coast and met up with some characters on set.

The movie being made is called “In Like Flynn” and is about famous Hollywood actor Errol Flynn who was born in Tasmania.

Actors portraying police officers of that era contrasted against police officers of the current day and definitely more pockets and accoutrements were noticeable.

It was also noted that there were less places for accoutrements, front pockets for perhaps a notebook, side pant pockets for handcuffs and a baton pocket in the rear right side of the trousers.

Thanks to the Queensland Police Museum that helped with the dress of those days.

FROM the VAULT – All part of the Police Service in 1910

The notice read; ‘SNAKE BITES. The Police generally are directed to report all instances of snake-bite coming within their knowledge, together with the treatment adopted and the result thereof.  The principal reason assigned for obtaining this information is to arrive at right conclusions as to the efficacy of the use of strychnine by hypodermic injection in cases of snake-bite, which, it is asserted authoritatively, has been to the present almost unfailing in apparently desperate cases, and it is considered that a full record of all instances of bites by snakes will be of great public utility. W.E. PARRY-OKEDEN, Acting Commissioner of Police, Police Department, Commissioner’s Office, Brisbane, 5th February 1892.’

Report of snake bite by Constable 1/c Miller, to Chief Inspector Urquhart, 16 November 1910.
Scanned document courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

 

Constable 1/c John Emeric Vidal Miller didn’t forget the directive, for in 1910, whilst stationed at Seymour River, he encountered a 13 year old black snake bite victim and provided the following report to his superior in Townsville:

            Sir, I beg to report that about 11:30am on the 10th November my attention was called by hearing the sound of crying towards the scrub, about the Seymour River Police Station.  I went in the direction and discovered a young lad named James Jackson, who stated he had been bitten by a black snake whilst trying to catch a horse in the scrub.  I at once tied my handkerchief round his leg, above the bite.  I afterwards mixed three drops of liquid Ammonia, in a teacupful of water, and dosed the boy with it, a teaspoonful at a time about every minute and in the meantime, a buggy was procured and I conveyed the boy to Ingham Hospital, nine miles from here to the nearest Doctor.  I continued the Ammonia treatment all the way and the boy did not become sleepy till treated at the Hospital, from whence he was discharged cured on the 12th November.

Chief Inspector Urquhart (later, Police Commissioner) from Townsville forwarded the correspondence onto the Police Commissioner, suggesting “the treatment adopted in this case might be of interest to the Health Department.”

Boating on the Seymour River, near Ingham, c1890-1900. Believed to be friends and family of Harriett and Donald Brims, enjoying a steam boat ride on the ‘Emilie’.
Image Number 132613 courtesy of the John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland.

The one man Seymour River Police Station opened on 14 May 1905, in the “E” District, Townsville Sub-district.  Constables Michael Guckian (1/c), Sidney Luck, John French, John Miller (1/c) and William Cook each spent approximately 2 years policing the station before its closure on 17 December 1914.

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This article was compiled by Museum Assistant Georgia Grier from the best resources available within the Queensland Police Museum.  The Police Museum is open 9am to 4pm Monday to Thursday and 10am to 3pm on the last Sunday of the month (Feb-Nov) and is located on the Ground Floor of Police Headquarters at 200 Roma Street, Brisbane. Contact: E: [email protected]

“FROM the VAULT – All part of the Police Service in 1910” by the Queensland Police Service is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (BY) 2.5 Australia Licence. Permissions may be available beyond the scope of this licence. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/au/legalcode

QPM SUNDAY LECTURE: A Crash Course in Forensic Mechanics

A Crash Course in Forensic Mechanics

30 April 2017
11:00am – 12:30pm

 Police Headquarters
200 Roma Street
Brisbane  QLD  4000

FREE ENTRY

Have you ever wondered how police rule out or take into consideration, vehicle faults or mechanical failure when investigating serious and fatal crashes?

Garry Ryan and Simon Major from the Queensland Police Vehicle Inspection Unit will present ‘A Crash Course in Forensic Mechanics’. They will outline the Unit’s responsibility for the mechanical examination of all types of motor vehicles and associated components potentially involved in serious injury or fatal incidents.

This one and a half hour presentation will start at 11am on Sunday, April 30 and will be both informative and educational, and is suitable for any audience.

The Museum opens its doors to the public on the last Sunday of each month from 10am to 3pm from February to November in addition to the standard Monday to Thursday 9am to 4pm opening hours. Monthly Sunday openings feature guest speakers from across the historical and crime-solving spectrums.

PLEASE NOTE: The Police Museum will open Sunday, April 30
from 10am to 3pm, and is located on the ground floor of
Police Headquarters, 200 Roma Street, Brisbane.

FROM the VAULT – Acting CoP Ronald Joseph Redmond

At the time of his application to join the Queensland Police Force (QPF) on June 19, 1950, Ronald Joseph Redmond was employed as a junior clerk by Qantas Empire Airways, and before that by Queensland Brewery Limited.  Unable to drive a car, ride a motor cycle nor a horse, and consider a poor bushman, Ronald focused on his strength, ‘knowledge of typewriting’, when he applied.  With the appointment approved and training completed, nineteen year old Ron commenced as Constable on February 4, 1952, and quickly joined the Crime Investigation Bureau (CIB) Communications Room.

By 1956, a promotion to the rank of Plain Clothes Constable and move to Brisbane’s CIB Field Staff was achieved, where Mr Redmond’s quiet and methodical approach exposed Queensland’s worst criminals.  For two decades, investigative teams guided by this Detective aided in countless arrests, bringing those criminals to justice and earning Mr Redmond many Favourable Records;

  • For outstanding work performed in connection with an enquiry into injuries sustained by certain babies at the Southport Hospital during 1971-72, and which resulted in the arrest and subsequent conviction of a former nurse employed at the hospital, 
  •  Awarded a Commendation for his dedication to duty and good Police work in connection with the investigation into the tragic Whiskey Au Go Go fire which occurred on 8 March 1973.  The very efficient and concerted actions of Detective Sergeant 2/c R.J. Redmond together with other investigating officer, ultimately led to the arrest and conviction of two offenders on a charge of murder, 
  •  Awarded a Favourable Record for outstanding ability displayed during the investigation of the murder by an explosive device of a young girl at Maroochydore on 7 August 1974 (see separate blog entry FROM the VAULT / Bomb Outrage Shocks Sunshine Coast Community).

Detective Sergeant Ron Redmond examines blood staining caused during a homicide, 1976.
Image No. PM1754 donated courtesy of The Courier Mail.

A transfer to the Public Relations Unit in 1977 harnessed Mr Redmond’s eloquent nature, after which he became overseer of Commonwealth Games operations in Brisbane, at the rank of Superintendent, in 1982.  This and further promotions to Assistant and then Deputy Commissioner placed the competent and composed police man in an extraordinary position; that of Acting Commissioner during the biggest enquiry in Queensland Police history.  In light of Fitzgerald Enquiry allegations, then Police Commissioner Terence Lewis stepped down from the top job at the order of the Police Minister which was filled by Mr Redmond.

Sergeant 1/c Ray De Bruyn of the Community Relations Branch models a new style broad brimmed hat, introduced for male police officers just in time for World Expo 88. Acting Commissioner Ronald Redmond (right) holds another example and shared the pride of Brisbane and Queensland in hosting this 6 month event.
Image No. PM3646 courtesy of the Queensland Police Museum.

The Telegraph reported sentiments expressed by the newly appointed caretaker Commissioner; “I have taken over in heart-rending circumstances, but with one firm priority – the intention of total service to the public.  We are facing a very busy year in policing – Expo 88 is one example – and I am confining my efforts towards policing, and the police (The Telegraph, 22 September 1987, p. 9).”  Almost 30 years on, the exemplary career topped by sound leadership during more than two years as Acting Commissioner is still cherished by police, civilian staff, and the public; a legacy on which the Service moved forward.

_________________

This article was written by Museum Assistant Georgia Grier from the best resources available within the Queensland Police Museum.  The Police Museum is open 9am to 4pm Monday to Thursday and 10am to 3pm on the last Sunday of the month (Feb-Nov) and is located on the Ground Floor of Police Headquarters at 200 Roma Street, Brisbane. Contact: E: [email protected]

“FROM the VAULT- CoP Ronald Joseph Redmond” by the Queensland Police Service is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (BY) 2.5 Australia Licence. Permissions may be available beyond the scope of this licence. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/au/legalcode

 

Road safety report: Easter Break – Day 1

A motorcyclist has been detected allegedly travelling almost 200km/hour on the Bruce Highway on day 1 of the Easter Break phase for the Queensland Police Service’s Road Safety Campaign.

The motorcycle was snapped yesterday by a speed camera on the Bruce Highway at Landsborough doing 193km/hour in a 110 zone.

There were more than 3,400 vehicles detected speeding and over 11,000 RBTs (Random Breath Tests) performed with 41 people charged with drink driving.

A 22-year-old Sunset man was charged after allegedly returning a BAC (Blood Alcohol Concentrate) of .273% in the carpark of a fast food outlet at Mount Isa just before midnight.

Police also attended two serious traffic crashes, one at Peak Crossing around 5.50pm where a ute and truck collided on Warrill View Peak Crossing Road.

The 18-year-old male driver of the ute was airlifted in a critical condition to Princess Alexandra Hospital.

A 54-year-old male pedestrian has also received life-threatening head injuries after being struck by a car on Bath Terrace at Victory Heights last night.

During the Easter Break, extra police will be out in force across Queensland targeting high-risk road user behaviour including the Fatal Five: speeding, drink and drug driving, distracted driving, fatigue and failing to wear a seatbelt.

The Easter Break phase of the Road Safety Campaign will continue until Easter Monday, 2017.



Easter Break – Day 1 Statistics

For the 24 hour period to 11.59pm, 13 April 2017.

2016 Daily total Progressive 2016 Total 2017 Daily Total Progressive 2017 Total
Traffic Crashes
Fatal Traffic Incidents 0 0 0 0
Persons Killed 0 0 0 0
Injury Traffic Incidents 33 33 25 25
Persons Injured 48 48 32 32
Alcohol and Drug Testing
Random Breath Tests Performed (RBT) 18,763 18,763 11,140 11,140
Roadside Drug Tests Performed (RDT) 231 231 246 246
Drink Driving 69 69 41 41
Drug Driving Roadside positive tests (yet to be analysed) 52 52 38 38
Traffic Offences
*     Speed Camera Detections 2,032 2,032 2,720 2,720
*     Speeding (Other) 1,746 1,746 699 699
*     Seat Belts 53 53 29 29
*     Mobile Phone Offences 93 93 57 57
*     Other Offences 853 853 567 567
Total Offences (infringements) 2,745 2,745 1,352 1,352
Note 1: The statistics contained in this release are sourced from live databases maintained by QPS, are preliminary and subject to change on a daily basis.  Any data extracted less than six weeks from the end of a reporting period is considered preliminary.
Speed Camera Detections Note for 2016 data: 1. Data is extracted from camera databases within the Queensland Police Service (Traffic Camera Office). These systems are live databases and the reported statistics may vary on a daily basis. 2. Detections from road safety cameras do not necessarily result in the issuing of an infringement notice. Detections from cameras are adjudicated by an accredited Traffic Camera Office staff member. The adjudication process assesses whether there is sufficient evidence to meet legal requirements to issue an infringement notice. Detections include images and associated data files used for testing camera systems during scheduled maintenance periods and normal operation. Differences observed between detections and notices issued will be the result of camera testing and adjudication processes.3. Figures include data for mobile speed cameras (overt, covert & portable), analogue fixed speed cameras, digital fixed speed cameras, digital combined speed/red light cameras (speed detections only) and the average speed camera system.
Speed Camera Detections Note for 2017 data: 1. Data is extracted from camera databases within the Queensland Police Service (Traffic Camera Office). These systems are live databases and the reported statistics may vary on a daily basis. 2. Any data which is extracted less than six weeks from the end of a reporting period is considered preliminary.3. Detections from road safety cameras do not necessarily result in the issuing of an infringement notice. Detections from cameras are adjudicated by an accredited Traffic Camera Office staff member. The adjudication process assesses whether there is sufficient evidence to meet legal requirements to issue an infringement notice. Detections include images and associated data files used for testing camera systems during scheduled maintenance periods and normal operation. Differences observed between detections and notices issued will be the result of camera testing and adjudication processes.4. Data for some cameras is not downloaded on a daily basis. It may take at least 72 hours for all data to be available.5. Figures include data for mobile speed cameras (overt, covert & portable), analogue fixed speed cameras (where available), digital fixed speed cameras, digital combined speed/red light cameras (speed and red light detections) and the average speed camera system.

 

Road safety report: Easter Break – Day 1

A motorcyclist has been detected allegedly travelling almost 200km/hour on the Bruce Highway on day 1 of the Easter Break phase for the Queensland Police Service’s Road Safety Campaign.

The motorcycle was snapped yesterday by a speed camera on the Bruce Highway at Landsborough doing 193km/hour in a 110 zone.

There were more than 3,400 vehicles detected speeding and over 11,000 RBTs (Random Breath Tests) performed with 41 people charged with drink driving.

A 22-year-old Sunset man was charged after allegedly returning a BAC (Blood Alcohol Concentrate) of .273% in the carpark of a fast food outlet at Mount Isa just before midnight.

Police also attended two serious traffic crashes, one at Peak Crossing around 5.50pm where a ute and truck collided on Warrill View Peak Crossing Road.

The 18-year-old male driver of the ute was airlifted in a critical condition to Princess Alexandra Hospital.

A 54-year-old male pedestrian has also received life-threatening head injuries after being struck by a car on Bath Terrace at Victory Heights last night.

During the Easter Break, extra police will be out in force across Queensland targeting high-risk road user behaviour including the Fatal Five: speeding, drink and drug driving, distracted driving, fatigue and failing to wear a seatbelt.

The Easter Break phase of the Road Safety Campaign will continue until Easter Monday, 2017.



Easter Break – Day 1 Statistics

For the 24 hour period to 11.59pm, 13 April 2017.

2016/17 Daily total Progressive 2016/17 Total 2015/16 Daily Total Progressive 2015/16 Total
Traffic Crashes
Fatal Traffic Incidents 0 0 0 0
Persons Killed 0 0 0 0
Injury Traffic Incidents 33 33 25 25
Persons Injured 48 48 32 32
Alcohol and Drug Testing
Random Breath Tests Performed (RBT) 18,763 18,763 11,140 11,140
Roadside Drug Tests Performed (RDT) 231 231 246 246
Drink Driving 69 69 41 41
Drug Driving Roadside positive tests (yet to be analysed) 52 52 38 38
Traffic Offences
*     Speed Camera Detections 2,032 2,032 2,720 2,720
*     Speeding (Other) 1,746 1,746 699 699
*     Seat Belts 53 53 29 29
*     Mobile Phone Offences 93 93 57 57
*     Other Offences 853 853 567 567
Total Offences (infringements) 2,745 2,745 1,352 1,352
Note 1: The statistics contained in this release are sourced from live databases maintained by QPS, are preliminary and subject to change on a daily basis.  Any data extracted less than six weeks from the end of a reporting period is considered preliminary.
Speed Camera Detections Note for 2016 data: 1. Data is extracted from camera databases within the Queensland Police Service (Traffic Camera Office). These systems are live databases and the reported statistics may vary on a daily basis. 2. Detections from road safety cameras do not necessarily result in the issuing of an infringement notice. Detections from cameras are adjudicated by an accredited Traffic Camera Office staff member. The adjudication process assesses whether there is sufficient evidence to meet legal requirements to issue an infringement notice. Detections include images and associated data files used for testing camera systems during scheduled maintenance periods and normal operation. Differences observed between detections and notices issued will be the result of camera testing and adjudication processes.3. Figures include data for mobile speed cameras (overt, covert & portable), analogue fixed speed cameras, digital fixed speed cameras, digital combined speed/red light cameras (speed detections only) and the average speed camera system.
Speed Camera Detections Note for 2017 data: 1. Data is extracted from camera databases within the Queensland Police Service (Traffic Camera Office). These systems are live databases and the reported statistics may vary on a daily basis. 2. Any data which is extracted less than six weeks from the end of a reporting period is considered preliminary.3. Detections from road safety cameras do not necessarily result in the issuing of an infringement notice. Detections from cameras are adjudicated by an accredited Traffic Camera Office staff member. The adjudication process assesses whether there is sufficient evidence to meet legal requirements to issue an infringement notice. Detections include images and associated data files used for testing camera systems during scheduled maintenance periods and normal operation. Differences observed between detections and notices issued will be the result of camera testing and adjudication processes.4. Data for some cameras is not downloaded on a daily basis. It may take at least 72 hours for all data to be available.5. Figures include data for mobile speed cameras (overt, covert & portable), analogue fixed speed cameras (where available), digital fixed speed cameras, digital combined speed/red light cameras (speed and red light detections) and the average speed camera system.

 

Road safety report: Easter Break – Day 1

A motorcyclist has been detected allegedly travelling almost 200km/hour on the Bruce Highway on day 1 of the Easter Break phase for the Queensland Police Service’s Road Safety Campaign.

The motorcycle was snapped yesterday by a speed camera on the Bruce Highway at Landsborough doing 193km/hour in a 110 zone.

There were more than 3,400 vehicles detected speeding and over 11,000 RBTs (Random Breath Tests) performed with 41 people charged with drink driving.

A 22-year-old Sunset man was charged after allegedly returning a BAC (Blood Alcohol Concentrate) of .273% in the carpark of a fast food outlet at Mount Isa just before midnight.

Police also attended two serious traffic crashes, one at Peak Crossing around 5.50pm where a ute and truck collided on Warrill View Peak Crossing Road.

The 18-year-old male driver of the ute was airlifted in a critical condition to Princess Alexandra Hospital.

A 54-year-old male pedestrian has also received life-threatening head injuries after being struck by a car on Bath Terrace at Victory Heights last night.

During the Easter Break, extra police will be out in force across Queensland targeting high-risk road user behaviour including the Fatal Five: speeding, drink and drug driving, distracted driving, fatigue and failing to wear a seatbelt.

The Easter Break phase of the Road Safety Campaign will continue until Easter Monday, 2017.



Easter Break – Day 1 Statistics

For the 24 hour period to 11.59pm, 13 April 2017.

2016/17 Daily total Progressive 2016/17 Total 2015/16 Daily Total Progressive 2015/16 Total
Traffic Crashes
Fatal Traffic Incidents 0 0 0 0
Persons Killed 0 0 0 0
Injury Traffic Incidents 33 33 25 25
Persons Injured 48 48 32 32
Alcohol and Drug Testing
Random Breath Tests Performed (RBT) 18,763 18,763 11,140 11,140
Roadside Drug Tests Performed (RDT) 231 231 246 246
Drink Driving 69 69 41 41
Drug Driving Roadside positive tests (yet to be analysed) 52 52 38 38
Traffic Offences
*     Speed Camera Detections 2,032 2,032 2,720 2,720
*     Speeding (Other) 1,746 1,746 699 699
*     Seat Belts 53 53 29 29
*     Mobile Phone Offences 93 93 57 57
*     Other Offences 853 853 567 567
Total Offences (infringements) 2,745 2,745 1,352 1,352
Note 1: The statistics contained in this release are sourced from live databases maintained by QPS, are preliminary and subject to change on a daily basis.  Any data extracted less than six weeks from the end of a reporting period is considered preliminary.
Speed Camera Detections Note for 2016 data: 1. Data is extracted from camera databases within the Queensland Police Service (Traffic Camera Office). These systems are live databases and the reported statistics may vary on a daily basis. 2. Detections from road safety cameras do not necessarily result in the issuing of an infringement notice. Detections from cameras are adjudicated by an accredited Traffic Camera Office staff member. The adjudication process assesses whether there is sufficient evidence to meet legal requirements to issue an infringement notice. Detections include images and associated data files used for testing camera systems during scheduled maintenance periods and normal operation. Differences observed between detections and notices issued will be the result of camera testing and adjudication processes.3. Figures include data for mobile speed cameras (overt, covert & portable), analogue fixed speed cameras, digital fixed speed cameras, digital combined speed/red light cameras (speed detections only) and the average speed camera system.
Speed Camera Detections Note for 2017 data: 1. Data is extracted from camera databases within the Queensland Police Service (Traffic Camera Office). These systems are live databases and the reported statistics may vary on a daily basis. 2. Any data which is extracted less than six weeks from the end of a reporting period is considered preliminary.3. Detections from road safety cameras do not necessarily result in the issuing of an infringement notice. Detections from cameras are adjudicated by an accredited Traffic Camera Office staff member. The adjudication process assesses whether there is sufficient evidence to meet legal requirements to issue an infringement notice. Detections include images and associated data files used for testing camera systems during scheduled maintenance periods and normal operation. Differences observed between detections and notices issued will be the result of camera testing and adjudication processes.4. Data for some cameras is not downloaded on a daily basis. It may take at least 72 hours for all data to be available.5. Figures include data for mobile speed cameras (overt, covert & portable), analogue fixed speed cameras (where available), digital fixed speed cameras, digital combined speed/red light cameras (speed and red light detections) and the average speed camera system.

 

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2017 SUNDAY LECTURE SERIES

May 28
Fingerprint Bureau
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June 25
The Petrov Affair - Petrovs in Queensland
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July 30
Is Jack the Ripper lying in Toowong Cemetery?
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